How much does it cost to run a fan heater?

If you’re trying to cut heating costs, you might be asking how much does it cost to run a fan heater?

Electric fan heater on the floor in a living room
(Image credit: Getty images)

Fan heaters are a popular choice as many of us try to heat up a room at speed, but ever wondered how much the fan heater costs to run and if it is one of the cheapest ways to heat a room?

As households are trying to keep warm for less, it’s worth knowing if it’s actually saving you money and how much it costs to run a fan heater. You may also be interested in our article on when is the best time to put the heating on

How much does it cost to run a fan heater?

A fan heater, an electric heater that blows out hot hair, will cost around 68p per hour to run a 2kW electric heater, according to research from our sister site GoodTo.com (opens in new tab).

But it might not be suitable for everyday heating or heating the whole home, as a fan heater only gives out temporary heat, and when you switch it off, you’ll find the temperature drops pretty quick.

So it’s worth checking if it is cheaper to run the fan heater or put the central heating on, depending on how long you want the heating on. 

Other factors also affect how well a fan heater works. Consider the size of the room you are heating; if it’s a small room, you’re more likely to feel the heat, but it may be difficult to retain the heat in a larger space. 

Check if you have efficient insulation in place so the heat has more of a chance of staying in the room. This doesn’t have to come at a big cost either, you can try easy insulation hacks like putting cling film on windows, closing the curtains and keeping doors shut. 

For major insulation work like cavity wall and loft insulation, you can see if you are eligible for a government grant under the Energy Company Obligation (ECO) scheme.

Fan heaters are easily available (you can even get them at the supermarket) and they are popular because of the affordable price tag attached to them compared to other electric heaters. 

For example, a fan heater from Dunelm (opens in new tab) costs £16, uses 2,000W of energy and according to the retailer costs 68p per hour to run. 

But like many other appliances, fan heaters also come with safety warnings. If you are using one, it should not be left switched on at night and never powered via an extension lead.

Other ways to heat the home

Heating your home does come at a cost, but there are many alternatives to try and ways to cut costs. 

Invest in other electrical heaters. Compared to other electrical heaters, fan heaters are known to be the least powerful, which might explain the affordable price. If you do have a big room you want to heat, consider an oil heater which is more powerful and will give out more heat. But note, it goes with all electric heaters that they are only useful for temporary heat, and not to heat the whole house. 

Put the heating on at off-peak times. If you’re on an economy 7 meter, putting the heating on during the night or at certain hours could cost you less. 

Do not leave the heating on low all day. Don’t fall for the myth that leaving your heating on low all day will save you money. For most households, it’s recommended to only put the heating on when you need it. If your home has a really good level of insulation, leaving the heating on low could be worth a test. 

Check if you are eligible for cold-weather payments. Once the weather outside reaches a certain low temperature, you could be paid £25 to put towards your heating bill. Check if you qualify. 

Be clever when using the oven. Once you are done cooking in the oven, leave the oven door open half ajar and let whatever heat is left in the oven warm your kitchen and dining room up. 

Vaishali Varu
Staff Writer

Vaishali graduated in journalism from Leeds University. She has gained experience writing local stories around Leeds and Leicester, which includes writing for a university publication and Leicester Mercury. 

She has also done some marketing and copywriting for businesses.

When she is not writing about personal finance, Vaishali likes to travel and she's a foodie.