Council tax hikes 2023 – how much more could you pay?

We reveal the councils that have confirmed or submitted plans to hike council tax bills, and how much more you can expect to pay

UK one pound coins placed on a Council Tax Bill
(Image credit: Getty images)

From this April council tax can be hiked up to 5% without a referendum after changes announced by chancellor Jeremy Hunt in his Autumn Budget.

And many councils intend to take full advantage of the new limit. Previously they had only been allowed to raise council tax by up to 2%. 

Londoners could be hit by the biggest council tax hikes in years. In Mayor Sadiq Khan’s draft budget, revealed on Wednesday, council tax for an average band D property will rise by £38.55 - the maximum allowed by the government.

And some second-home hotspots are also planning to target hefty council tax hikes on those properties. For example, Dorset Council is planning to double the charge for properties that remain empty and unfurnished for more than a year.

Here we reveal the councils that have confirmed or submitted plans to hike council tax bills, and how much more you can expect to pay. 

This list will be updated regularly. To stay up to date, you can subscribe to our newsletter

Council tax hikes 2023

Where is council tax going up?

Swipe to scroll horizontally
RegionExpected or proposed increase
Adur1.99%
Ashford2.9%
Brighton and Hove4.99%
Barrow-in-Furness2.84%
Bassetlaw4%
Bath and North East Somerset4.99%
Bedford2.90%
Blaby2.99%
Blackburn and Darwen4.99%
Berkshire (region-wide)6.76%
Bolton6.5%
Bracknell Forest4.99%
Bradford4.99%
Breckland4.7%
Bristol5%
Buckinghamshire4.99%
Calderdale4.99%
Cambridge4.99%
Canterbury2.24%
Chelmsford4%
Cheltenham2.99%
Cheshire East4.99%
Colchester3%
Cornwall4.99%
Coventry5%
Cumberland Council 4.99%
Dacorum1.99%
Darlington5%
Durham5%
Dudley4.99%
East Devon3.3%
East Suffolk2.81%
East Hertfordshire3%
East Lindsey5.42%
Eden4.99%
Gateshead4.99%
Gloucestershire2.99%
Hartlepool4.99%
Herefordshire4.99%
Hertfordshire4.99%
Hertsmere2.99%
Horsham2.99%
Lancaster2.99%
Leeds4.99%
Lincoln2.90%
Luton4.99%
Manchester4.99%
Medway5%
Merton2%
Mole Valley2.99%
Middlesborough3.99%
Newcastle1.99%
Newcastle-upon-Lyme1.99%
North East Lincolnshire4.98%
North Tyneside4.99%
North Somerset4.99%
North Yorkshire4.99%
Nottinghamshire4.84%
Oldham3.99%
Oxford4.99%
Peterborough4.99%
Plymouth4.99%
Portsmouth4.99%
Redcar and Cleveland3.99%
Rugby2.99%
Rutland4.99%
Ryedale4.99%
Shropshire2.27%
Solihull2.99%
South Norfolk2.99%
South Tyneside4.95%
St Helens5%
Stratford upon Avon3.2%
Slough4.99%
Staffordshire4.99%
Sunderland2.99%
Surrey Heath5%
Suffolk2.81%
Sussex4.99%
Teignbridge2.78%
Thanet2.99%
Torbay4.99%
Wakefield4.99%
Walsall2.99%
Welwyn Hatfield2.97%
West Oxfordshire4.57%
Wiltshire5%
Windsor and Maidenhead4.99%
Wirral4.99%
Worcestershire4.94%
York4.99%

More on council tax

Council tax is an important source of income for local government, paying for essential services such as: children's social care, waste collection, support for the elderly and vulnerable, schools, youth service, carparks and open spaces, roads, highways and street lighting maintenance, coroners, courts, street cleaning and street lighting. 

Nicole García Mérida
contributor

Nicole graduated with a BA in Journalism & Communications from Cardiff University and then went on to do a Masters in Magazine Journalism at City, University of London. She started off as an editorial assistant at MoneyWeek in 2019, and now as well as contributing to the website she’s a writer and section editor for the magazine. Outside of work she loves cooking and eating, her dog Moose and her cat Fish, and buying more plants than she can fit in her house.